Homolateral movement

Post questions and tips on the ability to perform unrelated movements simultaneously, for example, punch with one arm while making large circles with the other while jogging.

Homolateral movement

Postby quicksylver3 » Apr 30, 2006 15:01

I've been reading Science of Sports Training and am interested on Kurz's theory about homolateral movement. I saw the discussion about Shotokan and homolateral movement, which only got a "kinda" answer. I've never experienced, nor have I spoke to anyone who has been confused to the slightest extent after performing jumping jacks.

Also, I have seen success and have been successful with a "homolateral" striking method -- stepping forward with the left foot, striking with the right hand... swinging the right hand forward as a distraction and kicking with the right foot. I'm not saying Thomas Kurz is wrong, I would just like a little more explanation.

I definitely recommend the book, I'm only in the second chapter and have found quite a bit of useful information for training for my next martial arts tournament. It's just that I have used jumping jacks successfully in the past ( I like how the "arms up" part expands the rib cage so you get a good deep breath), so I want to have a little more information before I take it out of my program.

Thanks for any feedback from anyone that can give me their informed opinion on the matter.
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Re: Homolateral movement

Postby Thomas Kurz » Apr 30, 2006 17:04

quicksylver3 wrote:Also, I have seen success and have been successful with a "homolateral" striking method -- stepping forward with the left foot, striking with the right hand...

This is not the homolateral pattern. This is a cross-pattern motion.

quicksylver3 wrote:swinging the right hand forward as a distraction and kicking with the right foot.

If after the forward swing the arm swings back while the leg kicks forward then this too is a cross-pattern motion.

For in-depth explanation see the footnote on p. 26 and its source. Even more info is in David Walther's book listed at the Athlete's Bookshelf ( http://www.stadion.com/bookshelf.html )
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