Half Off Topic

Post questions and tips on measuring athletes' abilities and skills, on making short- and long-term plans, on training cycles and on periodization.

Half Off Topic

Postby Bushnak » Jul 06, 2004 19:22

This one is for Thomas.
Do you have any experience with military training and preparation?
I would like to know how do you feel the difference should be in the training methods.
Bushnak
 

Half Off Topic

Postby Thomas Kurz » Jul 12, 2004 16:50

I plan to answer a question similar to yours in my e-mailing. When I do I will post it here.
Thomas Kurz
Madrej glowie dosc dwie slowie
Thomas Kurz
Site Admin
 
Posts: 440
Joined: Dec 03, 2003 08:04

Re: Half Off Topic/Periodization

Postby Thomas Kurz » Jul 15, 2004 15:08

Bushnak wrote:This one is for Thomas.
Do you have any experience with military training and preparation?
I would like to know how do you feel the difference should be in the training methods.


Very little.

Here is the question that I answered in my recent e-mailing:

zachariah wrote:How do I design a training program utilizing the Science of Sports Training, Explosive Power and Stretching Scientifically for athletes that are "in season" 365 days a year (self defense students, law enforcement and military). I understand that this will be a compromise to peak performance but how can I do my best with these non seasonal individuals?


Answer:

In short--observe and adjust as your trainees work on all aspects of their training.

When you see that a trainee runs out of breath, stress aerobic endurance more than strength or muscular endurance or technical skills. When you see that your trainee has not run out of breath but is too weak for techniques or can't do the number of reps required then stress either strength or muscular endurance. When you see that all aspects of condition are ok then just maintain them until you see that your trainees are ready for a new higher level of performance. Then follow the concepts of accumulation, intensification and transformation (see p. 82 in “Science of Sports Training”), shifting stress to the abilities or skills that form foundations for further progress--as in the examples above.

Follow stretches of high intensity training with adequate rest periods. Some rest may consist of days or even weeks of working on the usual tasks but in shorter, less intense, and/or less frequent workouts, some rest may have to be passive, and some active--depending on the need (see definition of active rest in “Science of Sports Training”).

Study rationale for periodization to see why, even though your trainees have to be ready for a high-level performance (relative to their potential) year-round, they have to vary intensity and priorities of their training. See pages 56 and 81 in “Science of Sports Training” ( http://www.stretching.info/science.html ).
Thomas Kurz
Madrej glowie dosc dwie slowie
Thomas Kurz
Site Admin
 
Posts: 440
Joined: Dec 03, 2003 08:04


Return to Planning and Control of Training

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron