Interesting observation

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Interesting observation

Postby iaincmm » Nov 10, 2007 07:44

I study Tae Kwon-Do and having followed stretching scientifically I have recently been able to achieve both the front and side spilits. As a result my flexibility and kicking have improved hugely.

I have been studying a guy that I train with, I know that I am more flexible than him and when we do any max strength training I am his equal however when I spar him I notice that his kicks have far more snap, power and speed than mine.

The question is what do I have to do to make my kicks like that? Do I need to build plyometric exercises into my conditioning program? If so any advice as to what exercises and how to organise them into my schedule? I have to do a lot of travel with my work so any bodyweight style exercises would be ideal.

In the meantime I shall hit google...

Cheers,
Iain
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resistance bands

Postby elskbrev » Nov 11, 2007 20:15

iaincmm wrote:...I notice that his kicks have far more snap, power and speed than mine.

The question is what do I have to do to make my kicks like that? ... I have to do a lot of travel with my work so any bodyweight style exercises would be ideal.


You might try practice kicks using resistance bands or tubing. The object is to develop strength along the full range of motion, but particularly at the extended part of the kick. Tubing facilitates this because its tensile weight increases the further you stretch it.

Stay with lighter tubing so you don’t develop pain in your joints and so you can actually keep your balance when you kick against the resistance. Beginners should execute practice kicks against “light” resistance at a moderate pace, with controlled movement, 2-3 sets of 12-15 reps each.

The kit I mention below comes with R4=40 pound and R6=60 pound tubing. I find R2=20 pound tubing is enough for me (5’4”, 115# female), allowing me to practice daily without fatigue, though usually only about 4 times per week.

The “Lifeline gym in a bag” resistance band travel kit might work for you. ( http://www.thstore.com/thstore/ProductI ... GroupID=15 ) , or go to the hardware store and purchase rubber tubing, tie a knot in one end and brace that into a closed door hinge or tie it around a beam. Fashion a loop in the other end for your foot or ankle (ouch), or attach an ankle cuff.
    Note: The kit does not include an ankle cuff and the 6’ tubing may be too short once you tie a loop in the end. Find longer tubing and double sided 2” Velcro for an ankle cuff. If planning to use this tubing with the kit, also buy corks to place in the ends of the tubes so you can connect them to the kit pieces.

For the most part, exercises mimic kicks or are simple leg raises. If you are interested in specific information about exercises, let me know.

Best regards,
Cindy
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Re: Interesting observation

Postby Thomas Kurz » Nov 14, 2007 22:34

iaincmm wrote:I have been studying a guy that I train with, I know that I am more flexible than him and when we do any max strength training I am his equal however when I spar him I notice that his kicks have far more snap, power and speed than mine.

The question is what do I have to do to make my kicks like that? Do I need to build plyometric exercises into my conditioning program? If so any advice as to what exercises and how to organise them into my schedule? I have to do a lot of travel with my work so any bodyweight style exercises would be ideal.


Work with a heavy bag and stress speed and snap--quickly in and quickly out. When satisfied with progress, try working with crazy ball and focus mitt--always stressing speed first and penetration later.

When lifting weights, tense fast or as if to move fast or jump--even though the heavy weight won't let you jump. (Get used to it gradually, beginning with light weights. Make sure your form is correct!) You may also use therabands or tubing instead of weights, but it would be good to begin with weights--to get the feeling for selecting the right amount of resistance with tubing, etc.

For the whole program of developing explosive power, from standard resistance exercises to plyometrics with weights and without, see Explosive Power and Jumping Ability for All Sports: Atlas of Exercises.

BTW, It's hard to decide if this post belongs here or in forum Speed of Movements but I think that power development will make a big difference in the speed of your kicks, so let it stay here...
Thomas Kurz
Madrej glowie dosc dwie slowie
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Re: Interesting observation

Postby ninjaweapons101 » Jan 07, 2009 10:57

this is a no expert advice.
continue you stretching but with a twist of bag kicks...

I think that will give more power on you legs.
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Re: Interesting observation

Postby tyciol » Jun 07, 2010 12:38

For OP, when you talk about max strength training with your faster partner, what movement are you using to test this strength, and what kind of kicks is he faster at?

I'm just wondering if it's something like comparing a pistol to a side kick, or something less comparable like a squat with a roundhouse.

This crazy ball TK mentioned sounds interesting, my old TKD had focus mitts (I had to get my own heavy bag for hope though... I wish I got a hanging one instead of a ground one...) but never heard of this crazy ball. I wonder if it's like one of those speed bags in boxing tethered both above and below?
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