Children and knuckle pushups

Post questions and tips on strength training for athletes up to age 18.

Children and knuckle pushups

Postby akaoni » Jan 14, 2004 20:31

I recall reading an article citing the dangers of having children perform knuckle pushups. I can't find the original article. Without doing any real research (e.g. looking up medical studies), this is what I have found on the web so far... I wish I could find the original article where I read about this.

If anyone has more information on the dangers of knuckle pushups (for children), please refer me to your sources or explain further.

Thanks,
Garth Lynch

Sources:

http://sabaki.8m.com/pgenkokai.htm
(WARNING: Children who have not reached puberty should not perform knuckle pushups on a hard surface. It can cause damage to the growth plate of the hands.)

http://www.courses.vcu.edu/DANC291-003/unit_2.htm

3. Cartilagenous Joints - These joints are united by hyaline or fibrocartilage. These joints are usually present early in life to allow for bone growth. If the epiphyseal plate of these cartilaginous joints is damaged, growth in children or teens can be stunted. Some fibrocartilage joints persist in the adult. An example would be the fibrocartilage intervertebral disc in the spine that joins the vertebrae together or the symphysis pubis where the pubic bone joins at the base of the pelvis in the front.

http://www.emedicine.com/aaem/topic230.htm
Children’s bones are still growing and so are susceptible to fractures involving the soft areas where the bone growth is actually occurring (growth plate). Some of these growth plate injuries are difficult to diagnose because they do not show up on x-rays. Injuries near the growth plate areas of a child’s hand therefore may need to be treated as fractures (breaks) even with normal x-rays.
akaoni
 

Re: Children and knuckle pushups

Postby tyciol » Jun 07, 2010 10:58

I would definitely not be having them do it on hard surfaces, but then again, it's not something I think's good for adults either, but the risks are probably worse for children for the reasons you've mentioned. I imagine there would be less damage to joints by using padded surfaces seeing as how it would spread out the pressure so there's no specific points receiving great amounts of trauma.

If the pressure could be more along the back of the first finger bones rather than specifically the knuckle joint it seems better, even if some people train to impact specifically with the joint rather than the whole fist-quadrilateral.
tyciol
 
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Joined: Apr 07, 2006 12:27
Location: Ontario, Canada

Re: Children and knuckle pushups

Postby kurtdezhyrenze » Apr 16, 2013 23:39

akaoni wrote:I recall reading an article citing the dangers of having children perform knuckle pushups. I can't find the original article. Without doing any real research (e.g. looking up medical studies), this is what I have found on the web so far... I wish I could find the original article where I read about this.

If anyone has more information on the dangers of knuckle pushups (for children), please refer me to your sources or explain further.

Thanks,
Garth Lynch

Sources:

http://sabaki.8m.com/pgenkokai.htm
(WARNING: Children who have not reached puberty should not perform knuckle pushups on a hard surface. It can cause damage to the growth plate of the hands.)

http://www.courses.vcu.edu/DANC291-003/unit_2.htm

3. Cartilagenous Joints - These joints are united by hyaline or fibrocartilage. These joints are usually present early in life to allow for bone growth. If the epiphyseal plate of these cartilaginous joints is damaged, growth in children or teens can be stunted. Some fibrocartilage joints persist in the adult. An example would be the fibrocartilage intervertebral disc in the spine that joins the vertebrae together or the symphysis pubis where the pubic bone joins at the base of the pelvis in the front.

http://www.emedicine.com/aaem/topic230.htm
Children’s bones are still growing and so are susceptible to fractures involving the soft areas where the bone growth is actually occurring (growth plate). Some of these growth plate injuries are difficult to diagnose because they do not show up on x-rays. Injuries near the growth plate areas of a child’s hand therefore may need to be treated as fractures (breaks) even with normal x-rays.



knuckle pushups can create an iron fists...it can make more your arms and fists strong! :wink:


Consciousness is much more than the thorn, it is the daggers in the flesh.
kurtdezhyrenze
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Apr 16, 2013 23:11


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