A suggestion to Mr. Kurz when he answers questions

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A suggestion to Mr. Kurz when he answers questions

Postby Dean » Aug 22, 2005 00:32

I'm sorry but I was quite put off by the way you (Mr. Kurz) had answered a question from a gentleman who, as far as I could see, had a legitimate concern. I'm referring to his answer to the fourth question in Column #24.

First, I thought the lesson on the meanings of words like "martial" and "art" to be pompous and uncalled for. I don't see how that has anything to do with the question this gentleman asked. I thought your comment about this person's dread of 50 lbs as "pathetic" to be uncalled for. What's so pathetic about it? Here you have a gentleman who may be ignorant (I am using this term nonpejoratively) about weight training and is afraid that the weight may be too much for the back to handle. I know if I told my high school students that before they could do strength exercises for the hip flexor that they would have to first achieve doing back extentions with added weight of at least 1/3 their body weight, I'd probably get the same responses from many (if not all) of them as this gentleman gave. Should my response to my students then be, "Your dread of this weight is pathetic!" No. I should understand why they have that fear. I should understand that they are ignorant and that it is my job to help them understand why that fear is unnecessary. So, rather than belittle the person, you should have simply answered the question. I thought the second paragraph of your answer was quite sufficient to answer this gentleman's question whereas the first and third paragraphs were quite unnecessary and superfluous. The same can be said about your comment about "wimpy attitudes toward back training". I'm not so sure that this gentleman had a "wimpy attitude" but rather a healthy fear of what was unknown to him. Look, if I approached a squat rack with 300 lbs on it and said, "No, problem, I can do that." and then attempt to do the squat (of course not being physically ready for it) and get hurt in the process I guess you can nod and say, "He sure didn't have a wimpy attitude toward leg training." You could also say that I was pretty stupid for not having a healthy fear of getting hurt doing so much weight. So, simply because someone has a concern about doing so much weight, it doesn't necessarily follow that they are being wimpy. When you answer questions from those who are ignorant about things that you know so much about, it would behoove you to exercise a bit of charity and assume the best about the psychology of your interlocuter and answer their questions without belittling them. Your accusation that this person has a wimpy attitude and has no concept of what martial arts is is merely an exercise in psychoanalysis and is quite outside your own field. Psychologists themselves would be quite apprehensive about psychoanalyzing a person over the internet. Perhaps you're jaded from answering so many of the same questions from people you may feel are stupid (I can understand having taught in the public education system) but it comes with the territory of starting a forum and a column where you invite questions from the general public.

So, my suggestion is that in the future if you get a question from someone that you think is stupid or whathaveyou, be charitable and assume the best about the person and just answer the question as best as you can for them.

Cheers,

Dean
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A suggestion to Mr. Kurz when he answers questions

Postby Thomas Kurz » Aug 22, 2005 20:01

Here I quote that fourth question from my column 24:
"You state that leg exercises are to be added to the strength routine when one can perform 3 sets (10–15 reps) of back extensions on the bench with additional weight greater than 1/3 of the body weight. If I interpret this statement correctly, then for example, a 150 lb. person would add leg exercises to the strength routine when they are able to do 3 sets of back extensions on the bench using 50 lb. of weight. Is this the correct interpretation? If so, then since I weigh about 150 lb. that means I would have to lift an extra weight of 50 lb. This is a huge amount of weight, and it seems to me that only professional bodybuilders would strive for such a goal."

And here is a an excerpt from my instructions for Back extension on the bench in column 19:
“Initially you can put your hands behind your neck or cross them on your chest, but eventually you will hold a weight plate on your chest or a pair of dumbbells close to your shoulders. [...] Before attempting strenuous hip flexor and adductor exercises, you should be able to lift (ten or more times) additional weight greater than 1/3 of your body weight.”

So, it is obvious that the weight I talk about is to be arrived at in the course of progressive training starting with 0 lb. and gradually increasing. Even you write: “when one can perform ... with .. weight greater [etc].” That “when” implies this amount of weight is to be arrived at gradually. Wimps and whiners are those, who faced with a task (and so easy one at that) deem it “intimidating,” “impossible,” etc.--anything to find an excuse for not attempting it, instead of breaking it into easier chunks.
Last edited by Thomas Kurz on Aug 26, 2005 13:58, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: A suggestion to Mr. Kurz when he answers questions

Postby Dean » Aug 23, 2005 01:16

Thomas Kurz wrote:Here I quote that fourth question from my column 24:
"You state that leg exercises are to be added to the strength routine when one can perform 3 sets (10–15 reps) of back extensions on the bench with additional weight greater than 1/3 of the body weight. If I interpret this statement correctly, then for example, a 150 lb. person would add leg exercises to the strength routine when they are able to do 3 sets of back extensions on the bench using 50 lb. of weight. Is this the correct interpretation? If so, then since I weigh about 150 lb. that means I would have to lift an extra weight of 50 lb. This is a huge amount of weight, and it seems to me that only professional bodybuilders would strive for such a goal."

And here is a an excerpt from my instructions for Back extension on the bench in column 19:
“Initially you can put your hands behind your neck or cross them on your chest, but eventually you will hold a weight plate on your chest or a pair of dumbbells close to your shoulders. [...] Before attempting strenuous hip flexor and adductor exercises, you should be able to lift (ten or more times) additional weight greater than 1/3 of your body weight.”

So, it is obvious that the weight I talk about is to be arrived at in the course of progressive training starting with 0 lb. and gradually increasing. Even you write: “when one can perform ... with .. weight greater [etc].” That “when” implies this amount of weight is to be arrived at gradually. Wimps and whiners are those, who faced with a task (and so easy one at that) deem it “intimidating,” “impossible,” etc.--anything to find an excuse for not attempting it, instead of breaking it into easier chunks.


Very good point Mr. Kurz. I agree that you are talking about progression and that you work your way toward that weight and beyond. I also agree with your assessment of wimps and whiners. I just disagree with your assessment of that particular gentleman asking the question. I didn't perceive him as whining. Perhaps you did. If so, then I can understand why you made the comments.

Cheers,

Dean

Ok, I'm done with this thread.
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Location: San Diego, California


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