cycling by necessity, reduced ROM, how to counteract

Post questions and tips on how flexibility training fits with training for other abilities.

cycling by necessity, reduced ROM, how to counteract

Postby snarfer » May 06, 2006 15:14

I'm 35 years old and I'm training 20+ hours per week of circus acrobatics, gymnastics, martial arts. For strength/endurance training I've started following the Crossfit workout. I take a rest day when necessary, so I'm not perpetually tired, but the large volume of training is necessary for my work as a professional stuntman/acrobat.

On top of this, however, I use a bicycle for virtually all of my transportation needs. I'm a perpetual traveler spending a lot of time in Los Angeles, and purchasing motorized transport is not an option. Public tranport won't work either, and running 30-40 miles a day with a big backpack on to get to training and errands and work is not realistic. I've thought about adding inline skating into the mix, but haven't done so yet.

My number one problem is inability to tilt my pelvis forward with straight legs. A PT measured my passive ROM in lifting straightened leg at 70 degrees, both legs. 90 degrees is average from what I understand. I believe my pelvis is tilted anteriorly in most hamstring stretches, despite my best efforts.

Obviously I cycle intermittently throughout the day. So doing an entire stretch routine every time I cycle would be unrealistic timewise and probably overstretching anyway.

Do you think that the cycling could be at the root of my hamstring difficulties? If so, is there some simple routine I could follow in an attempt to counteract the reduction in leg ROM?
snarfer
 
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Re: cycling by necessity, reduced ROM, how to counteract

Postby dragon » May 08, 2006 05:39

snarfer wrote:My number one problem is inability to tilt my pelvis forward with straight legs. A PT measured my passive ROM in lifting straightened leg at 70 degrees, both legs. 90 degrees is average from what I understand. I believe my pelvis is tilted anteriorly in most hamstring stretches, despite my best efforts.


Anterior pelvis tilt is usually(to my knowledge) caused by tight hip flexors.

Here's an article you may find useful.It lists some of the causes and symptoms:-

http://www.dolfzine.com/page584.htm

If this is the case i would say it is down to the amount of cycling you do.I can think of no other way to counter this problem other than a good stretching routine.

Dragon.
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Postby Siveal » May 18, 2006 21:47

I have a question on this same topic... I've been looking into purchasing a new road bike from Trek for purposes of cross training in my standard strength training, running, and swimming routine. I even thought about trying a triathlon later this fall when I had enough strength/endurance built.

My question to you folks, if cycling is done properly with enough warmup, strengthing, then intensive cycling workout.... are you still faced with low flexibility?

I generally warmup with a mild jog, jumping jacks, jump rope, or somethig similar before I head into stretches, then afterwards I would hit a resistance bike for training.

For example, u can really do a lot of running. My idea comes from the fact that power walkers have to run for their training. I think Kurz meant that using cycling as a constant method of training will shorten your muscles, and thus make u less flexible. [...] I think your solution lies upon these lines.


Edit:
I found my answer but I'm still bothered by the fact that cycling can cause such a huge problem... Wouldn't this be true with any sport if inadequte stretching isn't done? I have read many triathlete and bicycling articles that do not even touch on flexibility but then again I am new to the sport.

I am ordering a copy of Stretching Scientifically (4th Revision ed) to take a look at the books ideas. I did read through your articles and there is a lot of great information... hopefully I can come back to the forums with a more -knowledgable- outlook on the science behind things and ask better informed questions after reading it.

Thanks.

Chris
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Postby dragon » May 19, 2006 05:21

Hi,

In Stretching Scientifically it also says,"The situation with standard push ups is similar.......no amount of static stretching will make you a baseballpitcher or a javalin thrower".

Well,i don't want to be a baseball pitcher or javalin thower so i don't require as much flexibility in my shoulders/chest.Like many other martial artists/boxers,i will continue to do push ups.

The same can be said for you and riding a bike.If this is your chosen sport then high kicks and the splits aren't required for you to excel.

Dragon.
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