PNF Stretchning

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PNF Stretchning

Postby teotjunk » Dec 27, 2007 05:43

I am trying tor read up on PNF Stretching and I read that it involves involves performing two isometric contractions: first of the agonists, then, of the antagonist.

I am not sure what it means by isometric contraction of agnoists and antagonists muscles



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PNF

Postby elskbrev » Jan 01, 2008 18:19

teotjunk,

Kurz's isometric methods generally employ contract relax (CR) PNF, where the stretched muscle (the antagonist) is tensed, relaxed then tensed again. Except that you said the agonist is tensed first, you describe contract relax agonist contract (CRAC) PNF, which takes the sequence one step further by next tensing and relaxing the opposing muscles (the agonists).

In a hamstring stretch, for example, hamstrings are the antagonists and quads are the agonists. (In a CRAC stretch, you would first stretch the hams, then tense and relax them, deepen the stretch, then tense and relax the quads, move deeper into the stretch, then tense and relax the hams, stretch further, tense and relax the quads, and so on.)

There is an explanation of this in Kim’s Ultimate Flexibility. He says CRAC has proven more effective than CR, and both are advanced techniques carrying a high risk of injury if done incorrectly. His book describes only the basic PNF technique and he recommends that you get hands on instruction from someone with experience if you plan to use these methods.

Note that Kurz's method of training for the side splits is similar to the CRAC technique in that the agonists (outer thigh muscles) are constantly at work as you stand in the horse riding stance while doing contract/relax exercises on your adductors, which in this case are the the antagonists.

I hope this is helpful.

Cindy
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Re: PNF

Postby teotjunk » Jun 21, 2008 07:20

What is considered basic PNF technique ?



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Re: PNF Stretching

Postby elskbrev » Jun 23, 2008 10:48

All proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) involves at least the combination of first tensing (isometrically or against resistance) the muscle to be stretched while it is in an extended or stretched position and then stretching it further. There are various ways to achieve this.

What resources have you read in your research on PNF, so far?

Regards,
Cindy
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Re: PNF Stretchning

Postby teotjunk » Jun 23, 2008 18:50

Other than stretching scientifically, the is the other resource that I have read

http://www.cmcrossroads.com/bradapp/doc ... tretching/



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Re: PNF

Postby teotjunk » Jul 18, 2008 01:50

elskbrev wrote:teotjunk,

Kurz's isometric methods generally employ contract relax (CR) PNF, where the stretched muscle (the antagonist) is tensed, relaxed then tensed again. Except that you said the agonist is tensed first, you describe contract relax agonist contract (CRAC) PNF, which takes the sequence one step further by next tensing and relaxing the opposing muscles (the agonists).

In a hamstring stretch, for example, hamstrings are the antagonists and quads are the agonists. (In a CRAC stretch, you would first stretch the hams, then tense and relax them, deepen the stretch, then tense and relax the quads, move deeper into the stretch, then tense and relax the hams, stretch further, tense and relax the quads, and so on.)

There is an explanation of this in Kim’s Ultimate Flexibility. He says CRAC has proven more effective than CR, and both are advanced techniques carrying a high risk of injury if done incorrectly. His book describes only the basic PNF technique and he recommends that you get hands on instruction from someone with experience if you plan to use these methods.

Note that Kurz's method of training for the side splits is similar to the CRAC technique in that the agonists (outer thigh muscles) are constantly at work as you stand in the horse riding stance while doing contract/relax exercises on your adductors, which in this case are the the antagonists.

I hope this is helpful.

Cindy


Do you happen to know any book or DVD that expalins PNF stretching extensively ? Thanks


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