progression to max strength exercises

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progression to max strength exercises

Postby CSta » Oct 03, 2008 16:58

In Tudor Bompa's "Periodization Training for Sports" he states, "The maximum load method [for maximal strength] can be used only after a minimum of two years of general strength training (anatomical adaptation) using lighter loads." (p.174). In his discussion of anatomical adaptation, he recommends the use of loads between 30-40% of 1RM for beginners and recommends a duration of 8-10 weeks. What loads are appropriate for the time after the initial 8-10 weeks of anatomical adaptation and before the end of the 2 years? Those appropriate for hypertrophic training?

I notice also that the recommended duration for hypertrophic training is 4-6 weeks. What should a beginner do at the end of that period? Fall back to lower loads?
(I don't think I made that question very clear. What I mean to ask is, if after completing the anatomical adaption phase (of 8-10 weeks) during the first 2 years of a beginner's training the beginner should work out using hypertrophic loads, what loads should the beginner use after the end of the hypertrophic phase (of 4-6 weeks)?
CSta
 
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Re: progression to max strength exercises

Postby CSta » Oct 22, 2008 15:37

I'll attempt to answer my own question. For beginners in the anatomical adaptation phase, Bompa says use loads between 30% and 45% of 1RM. (I think that's the correct range. I don't have my book with me. Also, I believe for advanced athletes he says use loads between 50% and 75%(?).) Bompa also says that a beginner should not use the maximum load method for maximal strength (there are other methods), which uses loads between 80% (or 85%?) and 105% of 1RM, until the beginner has 2 years of anatomical adaptation under his/her belt. My question was what loads should a beginner use after the initial 8-10 weeks of anatomical adaptation. A possible answer: For a beginner not training for competition, he or she would gradually incorporate higher loads (50%-85%) according to his or her ability to handle them. (The same would apply to a competitive athlete's progression, subject to the needs of the particular sport and to the athlete's periodized training plan.)

This appears consistent with the ACSM's recommended strength training loads and hypertrophic loads for novices: For strength, "It is recommended that novice to intermediate lifters train with loads corresponding to 60–70% of 1 RM for 8–12 repetitions." Position Stand of American College of Sports Medicine, "Progression Models in Resistance Training for Healthy Adults," Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, p. 367 (emphasis original). For hypertrophy, "[f]or novice and intermediate individuals, it is recommended that moderate loading be used (70–85% of 1 RM) . . ." Id., at 370. In the strength training section, the article states: "For novice individuals, it has been recommended that moderate loading (60% of 1 RM) be used initially, as learning proper form and technique is paramount. However, a variety of loads appears to be most effective for long-term improvements in muscular strength as one progresses over time." Id., at 367 (footnotes removed).

In Article 35, at Error No. 2, where it is stated, "[a]fter eight to twelve weeks of [high volume/low load] structural preparation, you may start to build up muscle mass together with maximal strength, or concentrate only on developing maximal strength," I assume there's an unwritten statement, "so long as your body is ready for hypertrophic or maximal strength loads." An advanced athlete's would be; a novice's might not.

Also, in Article 29, it is stated, "To increase strength if you never have done any systematic strength training, you need to overcome resistance that exceeds 30% of 1RM (1 repetition maximum). Overcoming resistance that requires less effort than that increases your muscle endurance but not your maximal strength. Experienced athletes need to overcome resistance that exceeds 50% of 1RM." I assume the reference to 50% of 1RM is the load applicable to an experienced who has taken time off and is returning to training, given Bompa's recommended anatomical adaption load range for experienced athletes (above).
CSta
 
Posts: 329
Joined: Sep 05, 2008 14:54
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