Strengthening the Tendons?

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Strengthening the Tendons?

Postby Nightshade » Feb 19, 2004 19:02

After reading an article on Alexander Zass (AKA the amazing samson), I am intrigued by his training style. He claims that rather than train his muscles for maximal strength, he trained his tendons, then muscles. It seems that, according to the article, the man used extreme range isometrics to accomplish this, but I was wondering what specific exercises are best for training tendons. Anybody have any ideas?

-Shawn
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Postby dave, UK » Mar 01, 2004 07:27

In Science of Sports training Tom Kurz maintains that in preparing for strength training that high rep low resistance (up to 100 reps) strengthens tendons and other connective tissue around the joints. The best example is the un-weighted squat that strenthens the knees when high reps are done.

Hope this helps
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Alexander Zass

Postby Andy62 » Aug 06, 2004 14:17

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The "Burn"

Postby Kevinm » Sep 20, 2004 14:24

Along this line, does anyone know the physiological explanation for the "burn" in high rep exercises? Is it necessary to continue high rep exercises indefinitely to maintain the strength of connective tissue?
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Re: The "Burn"

Postby mmeloon » Sep 20, 2004 20:21

Kevinm wrote:Along this line, does anyone know the physiological explanation for the "burn" in high rep exercises? Is it necessary to continue high rep exercises indefinitely to maintain the strength of connective tissue?


I think the "burn" is just due to the accumulation of lactic acid in your muscles.

Your second question is interesting. I don't know the answer but I'd sure like to find out.

-Mark
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Postby Kevinm » Oct 04, 2004 19:57

Unfortunately, Mark, Mr. Kurz doesn't seem to be interested in answering that one. (hint-hint ) My guess is the answer is 'yes'. At any rate, I intend to continue to do high rep exercises routinely.
Kevinm
 

Postby ungar60 » Dec 26, 2004 06:20

the most effective way to strengthen the tendons is by doing slow eccentric training!!!
(do not do fast eccentric exercises because you have a high risk of rupturing your tendons!)
if you want to your muscles to become longer (read: built more sarcomeres) you have to do dynamic (or isometric) strength training in the range where you feel the muscle stretch a bit (you do not have to do the full range of motion)

i answered this one quick, if u need more info than ask!
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Tendon and ligament strength

Postby Andy62 » Jan 12, 2005 15:23

I think the best way to develop tendon and ligament strength is with isometrics or with limited range heavy resistance training [just like Alexander Zass or Arthur Saxon] To me the thought that you can develop tendon strength with high rep low resistance exercises in ludicrous. The example of the high repetition squat is more likely to cause over use injury than it is to develop tendon or ligament strength.
Andy62
 

Re: Strengthening the Tendons?

Postby Thomas Kurz » Mar 16, 2005 19:50

Nightshade wrote:I was wondering what specific exercises are best for training tendons. Anybody have any ideas?

-Shawn


To improve vascularization: high reps at low resistance.

To increase mechanical strength: high resistance.

dave, UK wrote:In Science of Sports training Tom Kurz maintains that in preparing for strength training that high rep low resistance (up to 100 reps) strengthens tendons and other connective tissue around the joints. The best example is the un-weighted squat that strenthens the knees when high reps are done.


Sets of high reps at relatively low resistance do more than just strenghten the fibrous connective tissue associated with the exercised muscles, namely:

strengthen slow-twitch muscle fibers (they are most active in joint stabilization and they are structurally stronger than fast-twitch fibers);

improve vascularization of muscles (so they tire less and recover faster);

improve vascularization of tendons (so they are less prone to inflammation and rupture--tendons most often rip in areas of poor blood supply).

For more, see columns 24 through 26 at http://www.stadion.com/column.html .

ungar60 wrote:the most effective way to strengthen the tendons is by doing slow eccentric training!!!
(do not do fast eccentric exercises because you have a high risk of rupturing your tendons!)


True. Slow eccentric tensions are very effective for strengthening tendons because in eccentric movements one can generate greater muscle tension than one's max in concentric movements. In other words, one can lower greater weight than one can lift. Tension, if not excessive, stimulates tendons to grow stronger (lay more connective tissue fibers and line them up right). The cumulative muscle tension that can be generated in a given number of reps is greater in eccentric movements than in concentric, or in natural movements (combined concentric and eccentric, with the amount of resistance determined by the concentric movement).
Last edited by Thomas Kurz on Mar 16, 2005 19:55, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: The "Burn"

Postby Thomas Kurz » Mar 16, 2005 19:52

mmeloon wrote:
Kevinm wrote:Along this line, does anyone know the physiological explanation for the "burn" in high rep exercises? Is it necessary to continue high rep exercises indefinitely to maintain the strength of connective tissue?


I think the "burn" is just due to the accumulation of lactic acid in your muscles.

Your second question is interesting. I don't know the answer but I'd sure like to find out.

-Mark


Close enough. For more detailed explanation of what causes the burn, see Muscle Fatigue in Stadion News Summer 2001, or one of books on exercise physiology listed at http://www.stadion.com/bookshelf.html .
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Re: Strengthening the Tendons?

Postby REG » Jan 11, 2012 17:32

Thomas Kurz wrote:...Tension, if not excessive, stimulates tendons to grow stronger (lay more connective tissue fibers and line them up right). The cumulative muscle tension that can be generated in a given number of reps is greater in eccentric movements than in concentric, or in natural movements (combined concentric and eccentric, with the amount of resistance determined by the concentric movement).


So then does that mean that tendons ultimately get stronger by being both bigger and more aligned? Also, is a stiffer tendon not necessarily a stronger tendon?

Also, are there actually such exercises that only consist of eccentric movements?
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Re: Strengthening the Tendons?

Postby REG » Mar 27, 2012 18:03

Thomas Kurz wrote:as wondering what specific exercises are best for training tendons. Anybody have any ideas?

-Shawn

To improve vascularization: high reps at low resistance.

To increase mechanical strength: high resistance.


What does Mr. Kurz exactly mean by mechanical strength? I have read all of his articles as diligently as I possibly could, including the online 2008 stadion newsletter article, as well as searching through this entire forum extremely thoroughly; however, I actually still seem unsure as to what he means by high resistance increases mechanical strength of tendons. I have not been able to really find any answer or explanation to this particular idea in any of Mr. Kurz's articles. It would be very helpful to me if anyone could clarify this.
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