Fear of ... (overtraining)

Post questions and tips on preventing, recognizing, and recovering from overtraining.

Fear of ... (overtraining)

Postby ssiidd » Dec 31, 2013 12:14

I am a Taekwondo'er, been away for some months (bad ankle sprain that had me undergo surgery, which has taken months to recover) .. anyways enough of my sorry story lol. I am looking to get back into training, I have been given an all clear for weight training, swilling, cycling and light running. I have been told to be cautious of any activity that would put a strain on the ankle joint (jumping, sprinting etc). This post I guess is more of "prevention is better than cure" ...

Given that I have been off training for almost 4 months, my fitness is zilch and I need to work on rebuilding. This includes my flexibility (whatever basic levels I had) strength and endurance/stamina. I also have an aggressive deadline of mid-March (TKD commitments!) and my biggest worry is I might end up overtraining. Given I need to improve every aspect of physical fitness, I have been unable to find a particular type of exercise I can perform that will help me get there. The questions I therefore have are:

    1- Flexibility Express - recently received as an xmas present :mrgreen: can I follow it solely to achieve my goals?
    2- Are there any other exercises that would complement the above, that I can do without killing myself?
    3- Is there a program anyone might be willing to share that I can use to aid in my goals?

The kind of training I have in mind will involve training twice a day 6 days a week, deep down inside I know this is not the most sensible approach ...

An unrelated (or perhaps not), question!

I seem to take very long to recover from injuries. My ankle for instance has taken a year and a surgery and is still not there. I had an adductor injury (practicing kicks) that took almost 16 weeks. Is this me genes or am I doing something wrong here? Apologies for the very open ended question.

Any advice, suggestions, comments will be greatly appreciated. I haven't had anyone (in my network) provide advice that would help and I come here feeling I might finally be able to get some help

Thanks & a very happy new year!!
ssiidd
 
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Joined: Dec 31, 2013 09:35

Re: Fear of ... (overtraining)

Postby Thomas Kurz » Jan 23, 2014 16:19

ssiidd wrote:Given I need to improve every aspect of physical fitness, I have been unable to find a particular type of exercise I can perform that will help me get there. The questions I therefore have are:

    1- Flexibility Express - recently received as an xmas present :mrgreen: can I follow it solely to achieve my goals?


Answer: No. Flexibility Express is for developing strength and flexibility, but not for endurance.

ssiidd wrote:
    2- Are there any other exercises that would complement the above, that I can do without killing myself?


Answer: Yes. Those mentioned by you already:
Swimming (for endurance, mainly breath control and lung capacity)
Running (for endurance, with a greater effect on the muscular endurance of legs than swimming)
Cycling (allows much greater intensity of effort than running without overstressing your ankle)

ssiidd wrote:
    3- Is there a program anyone might be willing to share that I can use to aid in my goals?


Answer: Other people’s programs may or may not fit you, so if they share theirs with you, you will have to customize those programs (see my answer below on avoiding overtraining).

ssiidd wrote:My biggest worry is I might end up overtraining.


Answer: To avoid overtraining, monitor yourself for early signs of excessive fatigue, such as poor sleep (waking up at night, waking up tired), lack of enthusiasm for exercising, being irritable, and excessive reaction to sudden stimuli (being jumpy). For more of those signs, see Science of Sports Training.

ssiidd wrote:I seem to take very long to recover from injuries. My ankle for instance has taken a year and a surgery and is still not there. I had an adductor injury (practicing kicks) that took almost 16 weeks. Is this me genes or am I doing something wrong here? Apologies for the very open ended question.


Answer: Long recovery may be caused by any or all of the following:

Rehab—poor choice of rehab exercises, excessive intensity of those exercises, wrong frequency of doing the exercises. This may result in disrupting the healing of tissues and preventing their maturation, plus inflammation.

Training—excessive intensity and volume of exercises (too intense and/or too much), so you end up with too much inflammation and excess acidity in your body.

Nutrition—wrong foods that do not supply enough macronutrients (fat, protein, carbs) and micronutrients (vitamins and minerals) to rebuild your damaged tissues and/or that are pro-inflammatory and acidifying. From my own experience, I learned that getting rid of pro-inflammatory foods has a better effect than increasing the intake of anti-inflammatory foods or supplements. For example, my shoulder was chronically inflamed for a long time—even though I ate many good things (such as avocados, olives, wild salmon) and took turmeric supplements—until I completely eliminated any grains (other than rice) from my diet. I used to have one or two slices of bread per day (and very little other grain products), and my shoulder was getting worse rather than better. Then my rehab specialist suggested I stop eating the bread and any grains, and the shoulder got better within days.
Thomas Kurz
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Thomas Kurz
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Re: Fear of ... (overtraining)

Postby rgawthorne » Jan 28, 2014 16:23

I sympathise with the injuries. Although my get back in to martial art training maybe different to yours but might be helpful. I was diagnosed with advance bowel cancer last november and about 6 months to live. Besides dealing with the trauma of the news, I still wanted to get back in to training its all i've done most of my life.

My weight had deteriorated to nothing so naturally my first step was to gain it. I have been eating natural foods but high in protein, and then to top it off I have protein shakes with an added powder of protein to give it an extra boost. If I have pasta dishes I add extra cheese, if I have breakfast its wheet bix and banana plus yoghurt and protein shake. Some times for a quick snack I have pasta and tuna. I have gained my strength back by eating carb and protein. Next step I had to have rests in the weekend to make sure the weight stayed on, otherwise the diet input = worked exercise= no protein storage.

I gradually did 10 press-ups, the 20 etc now 50. I also did this approach to situps.
I used the dumbells to gain strength In the arms, after my operation I could not lift a thing, I started with 5s and worked my way up.
I made sure I cycled in the gym at a slow pace, more on time than distance, then gradually built up the distance to 10 mile... on chemo thats hard work!!

I started with leg exercise eg squats and burpees.. great book to follow The Mens Exercise Fitness Bible.

Went on with pull downs weights, bench press and squats with the barbells
Now after exercises, I was ready for walks and incline walks, and a very slow run by my standards. After a harsh 2.5 months I'm now ready to go back to martial art classes.

If I can do it from the point of death, and take 2-3 months, im sure you can do it faster !!!
rgawthorne
 
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