Does aerobic endurance increase structural strength?

Post questions and tips on aerobic endurance and aerobic fitness.

Re: Does aerobic endurance increase structural strength?

Postby REG » Sep 04, 2011 14:42

dragon wrote:Not quite.I'm saying if you feel you may have issues with your form,go to someone who can advise/correct you.Don't try to self diagnose a problem which may not even be there.


Oh okay, I get it.

[quote="dragon"]The pace at which you run won't affect flexibility at all.Short strides(or even walking) won't reduce your flexibility like cycling can.[/quote

Hmm, and how come that's true? I mean if you ran short strides (or did walking), you would then be moving your legs through a shortened ROM compared to running with an elongated stride or as if you were doing full front splits in the air while running?
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Re: Does aerobic endurance increase structural strength?

Postby dragon » Sep 04, 2011 16:27

As i said previously,running alone isn't intended to aid you in doing the splits.It's a conditioning exercise to prepare you for more intense conditioning.

Here is how the sequence works:-

You need to do dynamic strength exercises(lunges,side lunges,etc) to prepare you for isometrics.....

But...

Before you do the dynamic strength exercises,you need to have a certain degree of general conditioning in the first place(running,skipping,etc).

Not every movement you perform has to have the same ROM as the splits flexibility,but you don't want to do any movements which will actually reduce your flexibility(such as cycling).

Dragon.
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Re: Does aerobic endurance increase structural strength?

Postby REG » Sep 13, 2011 15:39

Wait, I just re-read Kurz's Stretching Scientifically book again, and I specifically re-read the pages again on the reasons for the doing exercises through a full ROM. I can't exactly remember word for word what one of his statements says, and I don't have the book with me right now since last week my book has been misplaced somewhere in my home, but he says something like "If baseballs players were to do standard push-ups with a shortened ROM, then there would be no way that anyone of them would be able to pitch a good throw." So what exactly does Mr. Kurz mean by "shortened ROM?" I am still very confused by all this.
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Re: Does aerobic endurance increase structural strength?

Postby dragon » Sep 13, 2011 17:08

It means if you want to be a baseball pitcher(who needs flexibility in the shoulder),don't do push ups.......Likewise,if you're a martial artist who wants to perform high kicks/the splits,don't ride a bike.

Dragon.
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Re: Does aerobic endurance increase structural strength?

Postby REG » Sep 13, 2011 22:16

dragon wrote:Not every movement you perform has to have the same ROM as the splits flexibility


Actually, why is this true? I mean, wouldn't you otherwise perform a movement at a "shortened ROM?" Also, don't you need to at least extend the thigh behind you until it is parallel to the ground or nearly horizontal so that my hip flexors would be maximally stretched throughout the entire movement of each stride?
REG
 
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Re: Does aerobic endurance increase structural strength?

Postby dragon » Sep 14, 2011 04:23

Again,you seem to be placing emphasis on running to help you gain flexibility and it just isn't going to do that.

If you have Stretching Scientifically(fourth edition),there is a section on flexibility in different sports and how too little and too much for a given sport can be a hinderance.....On page 8 Kurz mentions how stiffness of the calf,Achilles tendon,and small ROM of external rotation in the hip can help a runner.....Likewise,too much mobility in the joints would be a hinderance....

When you're assessing your training goals,decide what you are:-

If you're a runner,you don't want too much flexibility/mobility of the joints as it won't help....

If you're a martial artist,why are you concentrating so much on running?

If you really feel that running will make you lose flexibility because you aren't running with the same ROM as the splits(no-one could run that way),then drop running altogether and just do the dynamic strength exercises that do work through a full ROM,work on high kicks(if you're a martial artist),etc,etc...There are plenty of exercises to choose from.

As i said in one of my original posts,practical experience is better than theory.If you have doubts about certain training methods,don't do them and see what works for you.

Dragon.
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Re: Does aerobic endurance increase structural strength?

Postby REG » Sep 14, 2011 17:38

REG wrote:Wait, I just re-read Kurz's Stretching Scientifically book again, and I specifically re-read the pages again on the reasons for the doing exercises through a full ROM. I can't exactly remember word for word what one of his statements says, and I don't have the book with me right now since last week my book has been misplaced somewhere in my home, but he says something like "If baseballs players were to do standard push-ups with a shortened ROM, then there would be no way that anyone of them would be able to pitch a good throw." So what exactly does Mr. Kurz mean by "shortened ROM?" I am still very confused by all this.


You know, I just realized something, Mr. Kurz might of actually said 'shortened position' and not 'shortened ROM.' Additionally, I have thought about this and there probably is a technical yet considerable difference between 'shortened ROM' and 'shortened position' of a given joint. If a joint moves in a 'shortened position' then the joint is moving through the flexed range of motion, which means that the muscles that move that specific joint move only through its contracted angles or through its flexed range of motion. The term 'shortened ROM' is more general and the movement in this case could take place either through its extended range of motion (through extended angles of muscles) or through its flexed range of motion (through contracted angles of muscles) or a range of motion in between those two ranges, etc.. So in the case of the hip flexors and the muscles (hams and quads) that extend and flex the knee, those muscles would be reduced in flexibility if one were to do bicycling, as bicycling does not allow a full range of extension in the hip and knee joints, which means that those muscles would move within a contracted position throughout the entire duration of such an exercise. With running, your hips and knees are able to move through a full range of extension in the hip and knee joints, which would mean that in this exercise the hip flexors, hams, and quads would move within an extended position or stretched position throughout the entire duration. I am not absolutely sure on this, but I think this is what you and Mr. Kurz mean or have been trying to tell me as to the reason why running is recommended over cycling. So, is this all correct?
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Re: Does aerobic endurance increase structural strength?

Postby dragon » Sep 15, 2011 03:45

To be honest,i've never spent that much time thinking about it in detail....All you need to do is work towards your chosen goal in the best way possible.

If you take cycling seriously,you may never be able to do the splits.....But that will be outweighed if you win the Tour De France.

If you're a martial artist/gymnast and you get onto a bike every once in a while,it's not going to destroy your flexibility.

There is no "one size fits all"....As is said in the book-Too little or too much flexibility can be a hinderance.

Dragon.
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Re: Does aerobic endurance increase structural strength?

Postby REG » Sep 15, 2011 12:47

I understand what you are saying, but the thing is is that not only do I want to maximize all of my abilities (speed, strength, endurance, coordination, agility, technique, and flexibility etc.) as much as possible, but I also like to understand such things as much as possible for the sake of learning the anatomy/phisiology of the human body. I am sorry again if I have been bothering you alot with all these questions.
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