Daily Caffeine Intake

Post questions and tips on right foods and right balance of nutrients for combat sports and martial arts, individual encounter games (for example, tennis), and team games.

Daily Caffeine Intake

Postby booluigi » Apr 23, 2004 05:50

Mr. Kurz,

I am a 33 year old ex football and track and field athlete. I have been practicing Shotokan Karate for two years now, and have consulted your online information throughout. I am in great condition as a consequence, and have nothing but praise for the information you offer.

I do have one concern though. Regarding the caffeine article in your Fall 2001 issue of Stadion News, I have read and understood the pros and cons of caffiene as you have presented them. However, I don't draw a definite conclusion as to how much caffiene is deemed to be the limit for an athlete's daily intake. Although I workout six days a week, I am a heavy coffee and tea drinker. I don't notice any glaring negative effects on my training or health in general. However, I am aware that I could be doing myself hereunto undetected harm.

I respect that you are not a medical doctor, and accept that your answer is not to be seen as an instruction. But, how much coffee and/or tea would you say is too much in an athlete's day? I bear in mind that caffeine levels vary in different kinds of coffee and tea.

Thanks in advance,

booluigi :?:
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Re: Daily Caffeine Intake

Postby mmeloon » Apr 23, 2004 15:01

booluigi wrote:Although I workout six days a week, I am a heavy coffee and tea drinker. I don't notice any glaring negative effects on my training or health in general. However, I am aware that I could be doing myself hereunto undetected harm.


I am not Tom Kurz but I think in order to notice any negative effects you would have to do an experiment where you cut out caffeine for several weeks and compare your performance and general well-being to how you normally are (when you are drinking coffee & tea). If you feel no different, then I think you could claim that caffeine doesn't seem to have negative effects on your training.

Case in point: if you had asked me last fall if I ate healthy, I would answer "Of course!" I thought I was eating right. In fact, I was careful to count calories and protein intake to make sure I was getting enough. Well, as of February I have drastically modified my diet to include many more vegetables and essential fatty acids. I eat signficiantly more fish and poultry and a lot less red meat (and when I do eat beef, it is good-quality cuts). The change has been dramatic! Had I not tried an experiment of changing my diet, I would have never knew how much more energy and better general well-being I could have.

Bottom line: sometimes you just have to try something new and see how it works for you. With guidance from Mr. Kurz and your own experiences, you should be able to determine the appropriate level of caffeine intake for you.

-Mark
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Postby booluigi » Apr 26, 2004 04:15

Thanks Mark,

That approach makes complete sense. I'm going to give that an earnest go. What better day to start than today? I'm going to have my morning wake up coffee, and my 11 o'clock pick me up at work. Then I'll have no more. I'll do if for a few weeks to see if I notice any differences.

Sometimes it's not the things you notice, but the things you don't, huh?

I'll keep you posted on my progress. Thanks again.
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Daily Caffeine Intake

Postby Thomas Kurz » Apr 26, 2004 09:33

Be aware of the possible caffeine withdrawal symptoms such as headache and, paradoxically, even difficulty with falling asleep. It may take a couple or a few days to feel well but it may be worth it.

I don't draw a definite conclusion as to how much caffiene is deemed to be the limit for an athlete's daily intake. Although I workout six days a week, I am a heavy coffee and tea drinker. I don't notice any glaring negative effects on my training or health in general.


If you fall asleep easily, sleep soundly at night, and wake up rested and energetic, then apparently you tolerate your caffeine intake well. The speed of eliminating caffeine from your body depends a lot on the health of your liver.
Last edited by Thomas Kurz on Apr 27, 2004 10:25, edited 1 time in total.
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Caffenine

Postby Guest » Apr 26, 2004 13:46

If you have been drinking alot of caffenine the only way to quit is to cut back slowly, I used to drink tons of Mt. Dew, Pepsi, Coffee, and decided to cut it all out, well I went through massive withdrawl symptons, like dizziness, headaches, and general distoration, so I went back to drinking caffenine and a few weeks later I decided again to quit this time I cut back slowly, replacing it with water, it took me about 6 months to finally go all water and not have any withdrawls.

So be very careful if you are a heavily dependent on caffenine cut back slowly and eventually you will be able to elminate it.
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