What is the vegetative system and neuromuscular system?

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What is the vegetative system and neuromuscular system?

Postby Kit » Apr 17, 2006 21:12

I have been reading the Science of Sports and training and can't find the definitions for the vegetative system and neuromuscular system. Can anyone point me to pages where definitions are given, or your own definition?

Thanks
Kit
Kit
 
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Postby fox69 » Apr 20, 2006 22:23

OK, here goes my attempt at explaining what these two terms mean.

The vegetative system consists of those bodily functions that are mainly concerned with providing energy and responding to the by-products of exercise. They are usually under 'automatic' control - i.e. we don't consciously think about them. So for example the heart rate rises in response to exercise as a function of the vegetative system. In practice this means that aerobic endurance, and anaerobic endurance exercise sessions are primarily stressors of the vegetative system because they mostly stress the energy systems. This grossly simplifies the nature of the body's energy systems, which are something you should become familiar with in order to devise effective training protocols (esp. for work-rest ratios in workouts, and longer term progression and variability of training).

The neuromuscular system consists of those bodily functions associated with movement and coordination such as movement of limbs, torso, movement of the body through space, and postural control. They are usually under conscious control - although well practiced techniques can seem 'automatic', but this is a result of learning and neural adaption rather than control by vegetative processes. So strength, speed, coordination, agility and technical work may all be considered to primarily be stressors of the neuromuscular system.

It is also helpful to note the use of the word 'primarily' in the above descriptions - an exercise session will usually stress both systems. Also stresses upon each system exist not only in a ratio to each other, but each can vary in the degree of stress.
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Postby Kit » Apr 25, 2006 22:50

Thank you. that explanation is very clear!
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Joined: Mar 09, 2004 20:45


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