Apparent contradiction between Column 20 and stetching video

Post questions and tips on developing strength-endurance or muscular endurance.

Apparent contradiction between Column 20 and stetching video

Postby Dean » Aug 21, 2005 04:21

Hello. I was rewatching the video to see how exactly to do the crunch and sit up after reading Column 20 ("Beginning Strength Exercises for Abdomen and Lower Back") and I came across what seems to me to be a contradiction between the two. The article says that when you do crunches and sit-ups, your chest should lead the movement and not your head. However, in the video they are both demonstrated with the head and shoulders leading the movement. The narrator even explicitly says, "Head and Shoulders should lead the movement." Moreover, in the column Mr. Kurz says that "During the raise press the small of your back to the floor for as long as possible. After the small of your back leaves the floor straighten up your back so you do not end up in a curled position at the top of the sit-up. (emphasis mine) However, inthe video the person leaves his back in a curled position. Which is right?

Cheers,

Dean

P.S. If anyone can help me with my question about sit-ups that I started in another thread ("'Legendary Abs' and Abdominal Strengthening") it would be greatly appreciated.
Dean
 
Posts: 30
Joined: Aug 18, 2005 18:33
Location: San Diego, California

Apparent contradiction between Column 20 and stetching video

Postby Thomas Kurz » Aug 22, 2005 19:46

In crunches and in sit-ups, the chest, shoulders, and head are to move as one unit (watch the video, best in slow motion). Focusing attention on the chest, rather than on head and shoulders, helps to lock head and neck onto the rib cage. My admonition, in the column, not to lead the movement with the head is for those who move the head separately ahead of the chest and shoulders and then complain of neck pain.

On the video sit-ups and crunches are done in the standard form--head and shoulders (and chest) moving together until vertical, then curl up past the vertical. (This curl-up is done by bodybuilders to squeeze abs at the end of movement.) This form is good enough for strengthening the abdomen and hip flexors (psoas) as much as it takes to progress to more difficult exercises for the trunk and legs.

The form of sit-ups described in the column is for athletes of combat sports who do long sets of sit-ups. Do a set of more than 200 sit-ups using some other form and you will know why.
Thomas Kurz
Madrej glowie dosc dwie slowie
Thomas Kurz
Site Admin
 
Posts: 440
Joined: Dec 03, 2003 08:04

Postby Dean » Aug 23, 2005 01:28

Thank you. That was very helpful.
Dean
 
Posts: 30
Joined: Aug 18, 2005 18:33
Location: San Diego, California

Postby Broncco » Jan 11, 2006 10:38

would not supporting the head with the hands, will lead to under-developed neck muscles?
Thanks
Broncco
 
Posts: 14
Joined: Jan 10, 2006 10:50

Postby dragon » Jan 12, 2006 07:46

Broncco wrote:would not supporting the head with the hands, will lead to under-developed neck muscles?
Thanks


When i perform ab work i keep my finger tips on my temples(if i'm not using weight).Some individuals may have a tendancy to pull on the back of the haed when they start to get tired with the hands behind the head approach.

Whichever way you do it,the neck conditioning side should be addressed seperately anyway.Unsupported sit ups won't provide your neck with enough conditioning if you participate in full contact arts.

Dragon.
dragon
 
Posts: 734
Joined: Jul 03, 2004 05:55

Postby Broncco » Jan 12, 2006 10:28

dragon wrote:
Broncco wrote:would not supporting the head with the hands, will lead to under-developed neck muscles?
Thanks


When i perform ab work i keep my finger tips on my temples(if i'm not using weight).Some individuals may have a tendancy to pull on the back of the haed when they start to get tired with the hands behind the head approach.

Whichever way you do it,the neck conditioning side should be addressed seperately anyway.Unsupported sit ups won't provide your neck with enough conditioning if you participate in full contact arts.

Dragon.


That is true. I meant like someone who works out generally.
But I agree, if you want a strong neck, crunches would not do it.
Broncco
 
Posts: 14
Joined: Jan 10, 2006 10:50


Return to Strength-Endurance

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests

cron